Dinamo Zagreb

 

Stadium Information

Club

Dinamo Zagreb

Stadium

Stadion Maksimir

Address

Maksimirska 128,

10 000 Zagreb,

Croatia

Club / Stadium Contact for Disabled Supporters

Name

Telephone number

Email address

Website address

Disabled Supporters Group

Contact Name

Telephone number

Email address

Website address

Access Information for Disabled Supporters

Getting there and Parking

 

Zagreb is the capital city of Croatia, and Zagreb Airport has a number of flight connections across Europe. The airport is situated in the suburb of Pleso, which is just a short distance away from Zagreb.

 

As the capital, Zagreb has rail links to a number of other Croatian cities, as well as some in neighbouring countries such as Slovenia and Serbia. The city has an inner-city rail system, as well as trams, buses and the funicular.

 

At the stadium, parking spaces must be reserved in advance. No accessible parking spaces are present. Parking spaces are 70m away from the stadium entrance, and are not signposted. The areas are stewarded, and stewards will have details of all vehicles that have pre-booked parking spaces.

 

The stadium has no dedicated and signposted gate for disabled supporters. They keep one entrance for disabled fans, which is close to the spaces for wheelchair users.

Getting a Ticket

 

For further information on how to obtain a ticket, please contact the club directly.

Spectator Viewing areas

 

There are 15 spaces for home-supporting wheelchair users in the West Stand of the stadium, and an additional 50 wheelchair users can be accommodated on the North Stand platform. Spaces are elevated, and sightlines are generally good but dugouts may obstruct some of the seats in the West Stand. Wooden benches are placed behind the space for a wheelchair user for Personal Assistants.

 

Blind and partially sighted supporters may sit anywhere in the stadium. Guide dogs are not allowed in the stadium. Audio descriptive commentary is not available.

 

There are no easy access seats or dedicated amenity seats in the stadium.

Amenities

 

Refreshment kiosks at the stadium have a relatively low counter, and low tables can be found nearby. Kiosks are around 50m away from accessible seating areas, and it is possible to make an order for the kiosk via the stewards.

 

There are 3 permanent and 6 mobile accessible toilets at the stadium. These can be found close to the spaces for wheelchair users in the North and West Stands. Toilets have low sinks, grab rails and no mirror. Furniture is not easily distinguishable from the walls and floor. The permanent accessible toilets are not signposted as toilets.

Services

 

For information of the services available to disabled supporters at the stadium, please contact the club directly.

Useful Publications and Policies

 

For further guidance, please refer to 'Access for All' - the UEFA and CAFE Good Practice Guide to Creating an Accessible Stadium and Matchday Experience, available in 14 different languages here.

 

For the detailed CAFE stadia report please click here.

View of the pitch

General view of the pitch

More Stadium Photos

Parking at the stadium

Parking at the stadium

Permanent toilets at the stadium

Permanent toilets at the stadium

Temporary toilets at the stadium

Temporary toilets at the stadium

Pitch-level view

Pitch-level view

FANS COMMENTS - HAVE YOUR SAY!

 

Have you visited this stadium recently? If so, please share your match day experience by posting your comments in the section below.

 

Please tell us about your match day experience - what was good, not good or could be improved.

 

Please upload any photos or any documents that help to explain your match day experience.

 

Your comments are important and will assist other disabled fans planning to visit this stadium and may help the stadium or club to improve its existing facilities and services. If you prefer, you can also post your fans comments anonymously.

 

Please note – To ensure comments posted are without malice, they are authorised by CAFE before being published on this website.

 

If you require assistance in using this section, please contact us by email at info@cafefootball.eu or send us a tweet@cafefootball or telephone +44(0)20 8621 2405 or Skype us at cafe-football and we will be pleased to help.

 

Translations provided automatically by Google

 

Comments

Anthony Joy

Match: Dinamo Zagreb vs Arsenal, 16/09/15, Champions League Group stage

Published: 18/9/2015

 

View slightly obscured by the team dugouts.

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Anthony Joy

Match: Dinamo Zagreb vs Arsenal, 16/09/15, Champions League Group stage

Published: 18/9/2015

 

Wheelchairs positioned on the ramp to the disabled viewing platform

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Anthony Joy

Match: Dinamo Zagreb vs Arsenal, 16/09/15, Champions League Group stage

Published: 18/9/2015

 

Arsenal’s first matchday in this seasons Champions League group stage provided opportunity to travel to a new country and a new stadium, as we headed to Dinamo Zagreb to play at the Stadion Maksimir.   With the back end of a heatwave to enjoy, and remarkably cheap fayre a great trip was in store.

 

Getting There & Parking

Most of the Arsenal fans spent the day in and around the main square choosing to spend the day in the many bars there and also around Dolac Market.  Stadion Maksimir is the national stadium in Croatia but is very close to the city centre. From the main square you could walk it in around 45 mins but I suggest taking the tram.  Routes 1 and 17 take you to the stadium (get off at the final stop Borongaj).  Tram number 1 is a typical eastern European tram with 2 steps up.  Tram number 17 is much more accessible for a wheelchair user, with a small step of about 3” to board.  Tickets can be brought from the magazine kiosks near each tram stop for about 10kuna (which is roughly £1).

 

The tram went very quickly and took us to around 15mins to reach the stadium.  The tram stop at Borongaj is attached to a small shopping centre.   Follow the road back from where you came and you’ll find the way into the away end. Dinamo Zagreb had laid on a “fan park” which amounted to a beer tent and some questionable hot-dogs, but a few more beers in the early evening sun were welcome. The fan-park was in a huge car park where coaches and other cars were being positioned.  I didn’t see any obvious disabled parking in this area.

 

Getting a Ticket

Our tickets were arranged through Arsenal however thanks to the post mine never arrived. Consequently I had to travel to Zagreb  without a ticket, planning to collect out there.  I dislike this enormously, it makes me nervous that something will go wrong.   Arsenal were great and met me at a hotel near to my own early in the afternoon so when I headed to the ground I was much happier.

 

The tickets were complimentary for both wheelchair and companion, although I went into the ground on my own. I was situated in with the Dinamo Zagreb disabled supporters at the front of the Zapad Dolje (West) stand; the 1400 Arsenal fans were situated at the other end of the ground with no access available. 

 

I entered through the away turnstiles and was escorted by an Arsenal steward and Croatian Police officer to the wheelchair viewing area.  This is about a 3 minute walk past the away end and under the main stand.   You enter the stadium practically at the half way line and make your way to the corner.

 

Spectator Viewing areas

I understand there are some wheelchair spaces in the Sjever Dolje (North) stand, but my tickets were in the main disabled area which is a covered platform raised about 6ft above pitch level.  It was full of Dinamo Zagreb disabled supporters.  I wore my Arsenal shirt but had no problems, even having a few photos with the Zagreb fans.  There were signed disabled entrances wide enough for a wheelchair to enter through a gate. You need to be careful with the surface however as several drainage channels need negotiating and some concrete is broken. You enter the covered viewing area along a 50m ramp with a gentle gradient.

 

Its difficult to say how many wheelchairs the area could hold; I would think 20 would be comfortable however Dinamo had obviously sold more tickets than capacity allowed, as wheelchair users and their companions positioned themselves along the ramp up to the platform. This practically doubled the number of wheelchairs, but made it impossible to get up and down the ramp.  You’d have difficulty in getting down to the toilets or refreshment kiosks under the main stand.  There are no companion seats anywhere, so if you do have someone with you, they’ll be standing.     

 

The view was good for the half of the pitch in front of me.  The far end (and goal) was obscured slightly by the team dugouts.   One of the Dinamo Zagreb wheelchair companions kept coming forward while singing and blocking my view.  Despite me asking several times for him to step back, he claimed not to understand and stayed in position.  There were no stewards anywhere to speak to so there was not much else to be done.   Given the level of the Arsenal performance perhaps it was a blessing anyway! The view was ok and Ive had much worse elsewhere in Europe..

 

Amenities

There were accessible toilets behind our section that I used on entering the stadium , which were spacious but be mindful that at half-time the crowded ramp would make it difficult to get to the toilet and back in time for the second half.

 

Services

There were kiosks under the main stand but these were very high and a large crowd of fans using them.  There is nothing dedicated for disabled fans.   I didn’t buy anything but a few of the Dinamo fans had bags of popcorn and softdrinks. 

 

After a pretty pathetic performance which saw Dinamo get a deserved win, their disabled fans were delighted.  I had no problems though and shook a few hands on the way out.   I had to make my own way through the crowd back to the away end to wait for my friends.   When we were eventually let out the Police directed us to a far corner of the car-park to access the tram.  The problem was there was a low metal chain around the perimeter of the car-park that I couldn’t get either under or over.   The Police wanted to lift me in my wheelchair over this chain - I refused to be carried and was backed up by the Arsenal fans. They along with my friend basically pulled a concrete pole from the ground so the chain lay flat - we put it back after!   Getting a tram back to the main square was easy if a little more crowded than our journey pre-match.   There was a little group of Dinamo fans trying to get a reaction from Arsenal fans so we made our way back to the hotel to have a few consolatory drinks.

 

Zagreb in general

This was my first ever trip to Zagreb; a bit of research gave me great confidence that it would be fine as a wheelchair user.

 

I don’t like making recommendations but I stayed at the Arcotel Allegra hotel; this has 2 huge wheelchair accessible rooms.   The bathroom was a fully functional wet-room, with shower chair and handles everywhere.  Although near the station it is only a 15 minute walk into the main square.  The surfaces are typical of Eastern Europe with cobbles and tram tracks.  

 

The café culture is well established in Zagreb; the warm weather meant we sat outside all evening. It is remarkably cheap for food and drinks; in three days I only spent £80.   Usually when enjoying the refreshments of a European city, you have trouble in finding accessible toilets.  In Zagreb I found 2 public toilets in the main square and in a nearby shopping centre.

 

On the day of the game we took a trip to the Old Town of Zagreb; you could take a cab as its up some very steep hills but I recommend taking the funicular off of the main square.  It costs the equivalent of 30p! The attendant will come out to open out a platform lift to take you up 3 steps to board the funicular. The Old Town gives great views of the city. Id suggest staying on the pavement as the roads are all cobbled.  The roof of the Old Town Cathedral is a tourist spot and good for a photo.   You could get the funicular back down but we went down a steep hill which took us to another street of café bars where we spent the afternoon.

 

We went around Zagreb cathedral and the Dolac Market which is huge and set over 2 floors. Both are fine for wheelchair users.

 

A pre-booked taxi to Zagreb airport costs about 100Kuna (£10).  The airport is really small with not a lot to do. Its worth noting the procedure that they insist on you meeting their staff to escort you through security and they take you and a companion to a waiting room.  There they asked me to get into the aisle chair while mine was taken for x-ray before being put into the hold!

 

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